REVIEW: AUTOart Honda Civic Type R (FK8) • DiecastSociety.com

REVIEW: AUTOart Honda Civic Type R (FK8)

This next model did arrive a few weeks back, it is the new 1:18 Honda Civic Type R (FK8) by AUTOart.  It might seem new to us in North America, as the folks in Asia and Europe have been enjoying the model for some time.  Under the direction of Honda North America, there were some unforeseen delays in this Civic and the Honda/Acura NSX.  The latter to hopefully follow suit of the Civic very soon!

The Honda Civic Type R (FK8) by AUTOart comes from their Composite and Diecast Series.  If you still aren’t in the know, the basics include the following, the exterior is executed in composite material (plastic) and some of the inner skeleton or bones are commissioned in good old metal.  If you want to learn more, review the AUTOart news link to find an in-depth article we posted a few years back.

Most would likely lean towards the boy racer Championship White exterior, we took a different approach and went with something more subtle, more mature, Polished Metal.  It is definitely tame but does provide some flash with the exterior and interior Red accent bits along with carbon fibre elements – the carbon fibre elements on the model consist of moulded and tampo application.  As for the paint, overall good marks.  We find zero issues with the application on our example.

Does AUTOart capture the overall design and essence of the original?  Without a doubt yes.  The styling is not everyone’s cup of tea, and we think Honda understands that.  The wide stance and exaggerated fenders and bumpers along with the massive rear wing do lean to a specific buyer. The young and the beautiful of course LOL…  On the flip side, one can appreciate the car for more than just looks, the engineering is comprehensive, and the results don’t lie, Nürburgring was clocked at 7:43.8.  You won’t believe the list of cars it distanced.  And even beat our personal fav, the Volkswagen Golf GTI Clubsport S which tamed Nürburgring at 7:47.1!

Now, it wouldn’t be fair if we didn’t mention this interesting tidbit that was accidentally stumbled upon.  While placing the model in the display cabinet in was located next door to the old AUTOart release, the 1:18 Volvo 240 Turbo Presentation Car.  Now we understand the Honda Civic Type R (FK8) is wide but should it be larger than the Volvo?  Cars of the mid-’80s were known for big and bulky.  So, is the model to scale? Hmm…

Moving to the front of the Honda Civic Type R we give excellent marks throughout.  Highlights include full perorated grilles with quality Honda emblems and more.  If you’re thinking why the outer section of the grille (left/right) is a solid piece, this is accurate to the original.  One thing we did notice that separates the AUTOart version from the cheaper and also well-executed LCD Model release is the opening in the solid plastic grille for venting is actually there.  That’s attention to detail.

Access to the motor is permitted.  Operation of the hood in flawless and nicely engineered hinges do the work well.  The shutline here is more than suitable, however, not a clean as found on the original car.  Motor detail is very good.  We like the use of colour and layers to up the realism factor.  AUTOart also provides a hood prop rod that nicely tucks away when not in use.

The rear is dominated by a massive spoiler almost two-tier like.  The addition of added aerodynamic elements is found in the rear roofline too.  Again, quality rear Honda emblem completes the hatch and lower three tip exhaust is ready to race!

Rear hatch is accessible, and operation is flawless with the aided magnets (strong) that help snap the hatch closed.  Inside the storage area is fully flocked and in quality material.  One can see why hot hatches are popular, they are so versatile as daily drivers and people haulers too.  Rear seats are fixed and don’t provide the option of a 40/60 slipt for the extra storage space.

The Honda Civic Type R wheels are excellent in appearance.  Kudos to AUTOart for providing a very accurate package.  Black paint dominates theme with five chrome bolts surrounding the Honda emblem in centre.  Front cross-drilled rotors are paired with solid in the rear.  Red, Brembo calipers complete the package.  Did we note the rubber band tires around the 20-inch rollers!

Access to the interior of the Honda Civic Type R is provided via all four doors.  This example is executed in a right-hand drive, something our friends overseas would appreciate more.  Once inside the interior is quite tame based on the exterior aggressive nature.  A little splash of flash is noted with the Red accents found on the seats, seat-belts, steering wheel and pin-striping within the dash – very accurate to the original.

What we like is the texture feel of the seat, very cool!  The Silver shift know is accurate and appropriate limited edition Type R badging is just below.  Even the racing pedals are found.   On the flip side, the fine detail within the dash and centre console are opening price point executed.  There should be more detail within crafting the vents and painting and illustrating the induvial components.  At about $280 CND we believe this is justified.

The wait was definitely worth it!  The AUTOart replica of the Honda Civic Type R does excel on several levels, most of which serious Honda enthusiasts will love to see.  A host of colours is currently available too, so if the Polished Metal doesn’t meet your boy racer fantasy there should be something in the AUTOart collection for you.  The question now is the more expensive AUTOart version worth the squeeze over the immediate competition.  For us, at DiecastSoceity.com the answer is no, but none of us are purists or Honda advocates, though we do have an appreciation for the overall engineering effort.  So, in short, this would be for you to decide, how important is the model for you?  Enjoy the pics!

 

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14 Responses to "REVIEW: AUTOart Honda Civic Type R (FK8)"

  1. Karsten says:

    I was considering this, but due to lack of space and little compatibility with my themes I will probably give this model a pass.

  2. Mike Wiseman says:

    I prefer the autoart model over LCD. Same with Kengfai’s Honda/Acura NSX. I just believe that Autoart’s representations overall have a cleaner, tighter appearance to them. Whether that has to do with the composite approach or just Autoart’s moulds and extensive experience in the industry is up for debate. In my opinion Autoart consistently executes top notch headlight, taillight, and grille/ventilation replicating. As well as the paint application. Hard to match in full access scale modeling. Exteriors ive never had a problem with Autoart. It’s everywhere else they seem to have started selling their fanbase short on. The interior on this car looks pretty good. I don’t think Autoart could have done much more to outdo the LCD dashboard due to there not being many knobs and buttons to accentuate. A lot of the navigating in this car takes place on the screen. That’s where Autoart needs to cut the ****. Leaving all these blank screens with a tacky finish in their $200-$300 models. Sometimes they apply some sort of neat display, MOST of the time they don’t. Just adds to the growing list of disappointing within a longstanding company once beloved by the masses within this hobby that has let the greed bug infect it. I believe that until Almost Real gets a bigger selection of different models out there to let Autoart know they aren’t the only ones that can execute scale models to that level of detail (and use diecast metal) then Autoart will continue this path of distributing 80% finished products for 150% retail cost to the consumer….end rant

    • Karsten says:

      That hits the nail right on its head! As much as I support Almost Real, in the lights department AA is still better. If Almost Real had Autoart’s lights, noone could hold a candle to them!

    • DS Team says:

      ” It’s everywhere else they seem to have started selling their fanbase short on. ”

      Well said! We’ve been complaining at the lack of engine and interior refinement for years. Not acceptable at this price point. Look at the eary releases from AUTOart, in some cases dramatically different.

  3. George K says:

    Got to be one if the ugliest cars ever made.

    • Robert says:

      Sure is ugly. But the ugliest? That’s up for debate, but it’s down there along their own Element,Clarity, most Insights, all Toyota Prius and Pontiac Aztec, Nissan Cube and that bug-eyed Joke, oops, Juke, Chrysler Cross-Fire, 1990 and later Chevy Caprice… Need more?

    • DS Team says:

      Depending on your age the pendulum could move to the other side. It definitely does not appeal to all.

  4. spikyone says:

    To answer your question on the Volvo, the Civic is about 9″ wider and a similar height in real life. Modern cars are huge compared to 20 years ago, and ironically that extra width is probably because of 21st century safety equipment.

    Disagree with the comments on its looks though, I think the FK8 Type R looks fantastic. As an example, a Golf GTI looks like every other Golf. This looks bonkers, and is much better for it. You know from looking at it that the performance is going to be crazy.

  5. Michael D says:

    Robert, you also forgot one that should have been so perfect – The 2020 Toyota Supra – Very hard to look at – Let’s hope that Nissan does a great job with their upcoming Z400 –

  6. Jay says:

    Absolutely beautiful thing, and the colour suits it wery well.

  7. JEJ says:

    Ugly is a strong word for any car enthusiast to use and to describe any car for that matter, best way to get the ire of the many who think that the design is both unique and functional. 7:43 in the Nürburgring is no easy feat for a FWD and embarrassed many other more expensive sports cars. I will not use the word ugly if I see your car even if it were ugly, As they say, if you can’t say anything nice don’t say anything at all!

    Excellent review as usual DS team!

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